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Regional Web Sites

Great Smoky Mountains Area - Guide - Al' Bout the Smokies

Middle Tennessee Communities - Guide - TennLinks.com

Northeast Tennessee - Guide - TriCitiesHomepage.com

County Web Sites

Blount - Official Web Site

Davidson - Official Web Site

Giles - Official Web Site

Giles - Chamber of Commerce

Grundy - Guide - GrundyWeb.com

Hamilton - Official Web Site

Jefferson - Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce

Knox - Official Web Site

Lawrence - Official Web Site

Maury - Official Web Site

Roane - Official Web Site

Rutherford - Official Web Site

Shelby - Official Web Site

Williamson - Official Web Site `

__________________________________________________________________________________

City & Regional Web Sites

Bristol

Chattanooga

Clarksville

Columbia

Cookeville

Dyersburg

Fairview

Farragut

Germantown

Greeneville

Johnson City

Johnson City - Guide

Kingsport

Knoxville

Knoxville

Lafayette

LaVergne

Lawrenceburg

Lebanon

Manchester

Maryville

Memphis

Memphis

Memphis

Memphis

Millington

Morristown

Mount Juliet

Nashville

Oak Ridge

Oak Ridge

Pergram

Pigeon Forge

Pulaski

Sevierville - Official Web Site

Smyrna - Official Web Site

Townsend - Townsend Chamber of Commerce

Troy - Official Web Site

Tri-cities: Johnson City, Kingsport & Bristol

Waynesboro - Official Web Site

Tennessee

Flag of Tennessee

Seal of Tennessee

Nickname(s) : Volunteer State

Motto(s) : Agriculture and commerce

 

 

Official language(s)

English

Capital

Nashville

Largest city

Memphis

Area

Ranked 36 th

- Total

42,169 sq mi
(109,247 km²)

- Width

120 miles (195 km)

- Length

440 miles (710 km)

- % water

2.2

- Latitude

35°N to 36°41'N

- Longitude

81°37'W to 90°28'W

Population

Ranked 16 th

- Total ( 2000 )

5,689,283

- Density

138.0/sq mi 
53.29/km² (19 th )

Elevation

 

- Highest point

Clingmans Dome
6,643 ft (2,026 m)

- Mean

900 ft (280 m)

- Lowest point

178 ft (54 m)

Admission to Union

June 1 , 1796 (16 th )

Governor

Phil Bredesen (D)

U.S. Senators

Bill Frist (R)
Lamar Alexander (R)

Time zones

 

- East Tennessee

Eastern : UTC -5/ -4

- Middle and West

Central : UTC -6/ -5

Abbreviations

TN US-TN

Web site

www.tennessee.gov

This article is about the State of Tennessee. For the other uses, see Tennessee (disambiguation) . Tennessee is a U.S. state located in the Southern United States . In 1796, it became the sixteenth state to join the union. Tennessee is known as the "Volunteer State", a nickname it earned during the War of 1812 , in which volunteer soldiers from Tennessee played a prominent role, especially during the Battle of New Orleans . [1]

Contents

[ hide ] 1 Geography 1.1 East Tennessee

1.2 Middle Tennessee

1.3 West Tennessee

1.4 Public lands

 

 

2 History

3 Demographics 3.1 Religion

 

 

4 Economy

5 Transportation 5.1 Interstate highways

5.2 Airports

 

 

6 Law and government 6.1 Politics

 

 

7 Important cities and towns

8 Education 8.1 Colleges and universities

 

 

9 Professional sports teams

10 Miscellaneous topics 10.1 Name origin

10.2 Trivia

 

 

11 See also

12 References

13 Further reading

14

 

 

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Geography

Map of Tennessee - PDF Tennessee lies adjacent to 8 other states: Kentucky and Virginia to the north; North Carolina on the east; on the south by Georgia , Alabama and Mississippi ; and on the west by Arkansas and Missouri —which makes Tennessee tied with Missouri as the states with the most states touching them in the U.S. The state is trisected by the Tennessee River . The highest point in the state is the peak of Clingmans Dome at 6,643 feet (2,025 m), which lies on Tennessee's eastern border. The geographical center of the state is located several miles east of Murfreesboro on Old Lascassas Pike and is marked by a roadside monument.

The state of Tennessee is geographically and constitutionally divided into three Grand Divisions : East Tennessee , Middle Tennessee , and West Tennessee .

Tennessee features six principal physiographic regions: the Blue Ridge , the Appalachian Ridge and Valley Region, the Cumberland Plateau , the Highland Rim , the Nashville Basin , and the Gulf Coastal Plain .

 

East Tennessee

The Blue Ridge area lies on the eastern edge of Tennessee, on the border of North Carolina. This region of Tennessee is characterized by high mountains, including the Great Smoky Mountains , the Chilhowee Mountains, the Unicoi Range , and the Snowbird Mountains. The average elevation of the Blue Ridge area is 5,000 feet (1,500 m) above sea level. Clingman's Dome is located in this region.

Stretching west from the Blue Ridge for approximately 55 miles (88 km) is the Ridge and Valley region, in which numerous tributaries join to form the Tennessee River in the Tennessee Valley . This area of Tennessee is covered by fertile valleys separated by wooded ridges, such as Bays Mountain and Clinch Mountain . The western section of the Tennessee valley, where the depressions become broader and the ridges become lower, is called the Great Valley .

 

Middle Tennessee

To the west of East Tennessee lies the Cumberland Plateau . This area is covered with flat-topped mountains separated by sharp valleys. The elevation of the Cumberland Plateau ranges from 1,500 to 1,800 feet (450 to 550 m) above sea level.

The northern section (in Kentucky) of the Highland Rim is sometimes called the Pennyroyal Plateau . To the west of the Cumberland Plateau is the Highland Rim , an elevated plain that surrounds the Nashville Basin . The Nashville Basin is characterized by rich, fertile farm country.This region is also known for its high tobacco production, and rich natural wildlife diversity. Its people are traditionally Scotch-Irish and still adhear to very traditional ways of life, thus giving this region a distinct "Old World" or pre-Civil War feel.

Many biologists study the area's salamander species because the diversity is greater there than anywhere else in the U.S. This is thought to be because of the clean Appalachian foothill springs that abound in the area. Some of the last remaining large American Chestnut trees still grow in this region and are being used to help breed blight resistant trees. Middle Tennessee was a common destination of settlers crossing the Appalachians in the late 1700s and early 1800s. An important trading route called the Natchez Trace connected Middle Tennessee to the lower Mississippi River.

 

West Tennessee

West of the Highland Rim and Nashville Basin is the Gulf Coastal Plain , which includes the Mississippi embayment . The Gulf Coastal Plain is, in terms of area, the predominant land region in Tennessee. It is part of the large geographic land area that begins at the Gulf of Mexico and extends north into southern Illinois . In Tennessee, the Gulf Coastal Plain is divided into three sections that extend from the Tennessee River in the east to the Mississippi River in the west. The easternmost section consists of hilly land that runs along the western bank of the Tennessee River. This section of the Gulf Coastal Plain is about 10 miles (16 km) wide. To the west of this narrow strip of land is a wide area of rolling hills and streams that stretches all the way to Memphis. This area is called the Tennessee Bottoms or bottom land. In Memphis, the Tennessee Bottoms end in steep bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River. To the west of the Tennessee Bottoms is the Mississippi Alluvial Plain , less than 300 feet (90 m) above sea level. This area of lowlands, flood plains, and swamp land is sometimes referred to as The Delta region.

Most of West Tennessee remained Indian land until the Chickasaw Cession of 1818, when the Chickasaw ceded their land between the Tennessee River and the Mississippi River. In Kentucky, this region is known today as Jackson Purchase .

 

Public lands

Areas under the control and management of the National Park Service include:

Andrew Johnson National Historic Site in Greeneville

Appalachian National Scenic Trail

Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area

Fort Donelson National Battlefield and Fort Donelson National Cemetery near Dover

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Natchez Trace Parkway

Obed Wild and Scenic River near Wartburg

Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail

Shiloh National Cemetery and Shiloh National Military Park near Shiloh

Stones River National Battlefield and Stones River National Cemetery near Murfreesboro

Trail of Tears National Historic Trail

 

Twenty-three state parks, covering some 132,000 acres (534 km² ) as well as parts of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Cherokee National Forest , and Cumberland Gap National Historical Park are in Tennessee. Sportsmen and visitors are attracted to Reelfoot Lake , originally formed by an earthquake ; stumps and other remains of a once dense forest, together with the lotus bed covering the shallow waters, give the lake an eerie beauty.

See also: List of Tennessee counties , List of Tennessee state parks

 

History

Main article: History of Tennessee The area now known as Tennessee was first settled by Paleo-Indians nearly 11,000 years ago. The names of the cultural groups that inhabited the area between first settlement and the time of European contact are unknown, but several distinct cultural phases have been named by archaeologists, including Archaic , Woodland , and Mississippian whose chiefdoms were the cultural predecessors of the Muscogee people who inhabited the Tennessee River Valley prior to Cherokee migration into the river's headwaters.

When Spanish explorers first visited the area, led by Hernando de Soto in 1539–43, it was inhabited by tribes of Muscogee and Yuchi people. Possibly because of European diseases devastating the Native tribes, which would have left a population vacuum, and also from expanding European settlement in the north, the Cherokee moved south from the area now called Virginia. As European colonists spread into the area, the native populations were forcibly displaced to the south and west, including all Muscogee and Yuchi peoples, the Chickasaw , and Choctaw . From 1838 to 1839, nearly 17,000 Cherokees were forced to march from Eastern Tennessee to Indian Territory west of Arkansas. This came to be known as the Trail of Tears , as an estimated 4,000 Cherokees died along the way. [2]

Tennessee was admitted to the Union in 1796 as the 16th state; it was created by taking the north and south borders of North Carolina and extending them to the Mississippi River, with one small deviation. The word Tennessee comes from the Cherokee town Tanasi , which along with its neighbor town Chota was one of the most important Cherokee towns and often referred to as the capital city of the Overhill Cherokee. The meaning of the word "tanasi" is lost (Mooney, 1900).

Many major battles of the American Civil War were fought in Tennessee—most of them Union victories. It was the last border state to secede from the Union when it joined the Confederate States of America on June 8 , 1861 . Ulysses S. Grant and the U.S. Navy captured control of the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers in February 1862, and they held off the Confederate counterattack at Shiloh in April. Capture of Memphis and Nashville gave the Union control of the western and middle sections; this control was confirmed at the battle of Murfreesboro in early January 1863. But the Confederates held East Tennessee despite the strength of Unionist sentiment there, with the exception of extremely pro-Confederate Sullivan County . The Confederates besieged Chattanooga in early fall 1863, but were driven off by Grant in November. Many of the Confederate defeats can be attributed to the poor strategic vision of General Braxton Bragg , who led the Army of Tennessee from Shiloh to Confederate defeat at Chattanooga. The last major battles came when the Confederates invaded in November 1864 and were checked at Franklin, then totally destroyed by George Thomas at Nashville, in December. Meanwhile Andrew Johnson , a civilian appointed by President Abraham Lincoln , was the military governor, and slavery was abolished.

After the war, Tennessee adopted a new constitution that abolished slavery effective February 22 , 1865 and ratified the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution on July 18 , 1866 . Tennessee was the first state readmitted to the Union on July 24 , 1866 . Because it ratified the Fourteenth Amendment, Tennessee was the only state that seceded from the Union that did not have a military governor during Reconstruction .

In 1897, the state celebrated its centennial of statehood (albeit one year late) with a great exposition .

The need to create work for the unemployed during the Great Depression , the desire for rural electrification, and the desire to control the annual spring floods and improve shipping on the Tennessee River drove the creation of the Tennessee Valley Authority in 1933. It quickly became the nation's largest public utility.

During World War II , Oak Ridge was selected as a United States Department of Energy national laboratory, one of the principal sites for the Manhattan Project 's production and isolation of weapons-grade fissile material.

Tennessee celebrated its bicentennial in 1996 after a yearlong statewide celebration entitled "Tennessee 200" by opening a new state park ( Bicentennial Mall ) at the foot of Capitol Hill in Nashville .

 

Demographics

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, as of 2005, Tennessee has an estimated population of 5,962,959, which is an increase of 69,661, or 1.2%, from the prior year and an increase of 273,697, or 4.8%, since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 117,203 people (that is 414,305 births minus 297,102 deaths) and an increase from net migration of 159,680 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 49,973 people, and migration within the country produced a net increase of 109,707 people.

Tennessee Population Density Map The racial makeup of the state (as of 2000) is:

80.2% White

16.4% Black

0.3% Native American

1.0% Asian

1.1% Two or more races

 

2.2% of the population is Hispanic , of any race.

In 2000, the five most common self-reported ethnic groups in the state were: American (17.3%), African American (16.4%), Irish (9.3%), English (9.1%), and German (8.3%). [1] Those who identify themselves as 'American' are most likely of British or Scotch-Irish (Ulster scot) descent.

The state's African-American population is concentrated mainly in Western and Middle Tennessee and the cities of Memphis , Nashville , Clarksville , Chattanooga , and Knoxville .

6.6% of Tennessee's population were reported as under 5 years of age, 24.6% under 18, and 12.4% were 65 or older. Females made up approximately 51.3% of the population.

Religion

The religious affiliations of the people of Tennessee are:

Christian – 82% Baptist – 39%

Methodist – 10%

Church of Christ – 6%

Presbyterian – 3%

Roman Catholic – 6%

Other Christian – 18%

 

 

Other Religions – 3%

Non-Religious – 9%

 

Source: American Religious Identification Survey (2001)

Economy

According to U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, in 2003 Tennessee's gross state product was $199,786,000,000, 1.8% of the total Gross Domestic Product . In 2003, the per capita personal income was $28,641, 36th in the nation, and only 91% of the national per capita personal income of $31,472. Total earnings were $167,414,793,000.

Major outputs for the state include textiles, cotton, cattle, and electrical power.

The Tennessee income tax does not apply to salaries and wages, but most income from stocks, bonds and notes receivable is taxable. All taxable dividends and interest which exceed the $1,250 single exemption or the $2,500 joint exemption are taxable at the rate of 6%. Generally, the state's sales and use tax rate is 7%. Food is taxed at 6%, but candy, dietary supplements and prepared food are taxed at the increased 7% rate. Local sales taxes are collected, and those rates vary from 1.5% to 2.75% (bringing the total to between 8.5% and 9.75% sales tax, one of the highest in the nation). Intangible property is assessed on the shares of stock of stockholders of any loan company, investment company, insurance company or for-profit cemetery companies. The assessment ratio is 40% of the value multiplied by the tax rate for the jurisdiction. Tennessee imposes an inheritance tax on decedents' estates that exceed maximum single exemption limits.

Tennessee is a right to work state.

Transportation

Interstate highways

Interstate 40 crosses nearly the entire state in an east-west orientation. Its branch interstate highways include I-240 in Memphis; I-440 and I-840 in Nashville; and I-140 and I-640 in Knoxville. I-26 , although technically an east-west interstate, runs from the North Carolina border below Johnson City to its terminus at Kingsport . I-24 is the other east-west interstate crossing Tennessee.

In a north-south orientation are highways I-55 , I-65 , I-75 , and I-81 . Interstate 65 crosses the state through Nashville, while Interstate 75 serves Knoxville and Interstate 55 serves Memphis. Interstate 81 enters the state at Bristol and terminates at its junction with I-40 near Jefferson City . I-155 is a branch highway from I-55.

Airports

Major airports within the state include Nashville International Airport (BNA), Memphis International Airport (MEM), McGhee Tyson Airport (TYS) in Knoxville, Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport (CHA), and Tri-Cities Regional Airport (TRI).

Law and government

Welcome sign entering Memphis, Tennessee on the Hernando De Soto Bridge over the Mississippi River . Tennessee's governor holds office for a four year term and may serve a maximum of two terms. The governor is the only official who is elected statewide, making him one of the more powerful chief executives in the nation. The state does not elect the lieutenant-governor directly, contrary to most other states; the Tennessee Senate elects its Speaker who serves as lieutenant governor.

The Tennessee General Assembly , the state legislature, consists of the 33-member Senate and the 99-member House of Representatives . Senators serve four year terms, and House members serve two year terms. Each chamber chooses its own speaker. The speaker of the state Senate also holds the title of lieutenant-governor. Most executive officials are elected by the legislature.

The highest court in Tennessee is the state Supreme Court. It has a chief justice and four associate justices. No more than two justices can be from the same Grand Division. The Court of Appeals has 12 judges. The Court of Criminal Appeals has nine judges.

Tennessee's current state constitution was adopted in 1870. The state had two earlier constitutions. The first was adopted in 1796, the year Tennessee joined the union, and the second was adopted in 1834.

Politics

Tennessee politics, like that of most U.S. States, revolves around the Democratic and Republican Parties. Democrats are very strong in metropolitan Memphis, Nashville, and Chattanooga. The Democratic Party is also relatively strong in most of Middle Tennessee, and West Tennessee north of Memphis.

The Republicans have the most strength in East Tennessee, one of the few areas of the South with a Republican voting history that predates the 1960s. Much of this region has not elected a Democrat to Congress since the Civil War. In contrast, the Democrats dominated politics in the rest of the state until the 1960s. The Republicans also have much strength in Memphis and Nashville's suburbs.

During the 2000 Presidential Election , Tennessee did not vote for Al Gore , who is a former U.S. Senator from Tennessee. The people instead voted for Republican George W. Bush .

Federally, Tennessee sends nine members to the House of Representatives. Currently, the delegation consists of five Democrats and four Republicans.

See also: List of Tennessee Governors , U.S. Congressional Delegations from Tennessee

Important cities and towns

See also: List of cities and towns in Tennessee Nashville : 569,891 (2000) Memphis : 680,768 (2005) The current capital is Nashville , though Knoxville , Kingston , and Murfreesboro have all served as state capitals . Memphis has the largest population of any city in the state, but Nashville has a larger metropolitan area . Chattanooga and Knoxville, both in the eastern part of the state near the Great Smoky Mountains, each has approximately a third of the population of Memphis or Nashville. The city of Clarksville is the fifth significant population center, some 45 miles (70 km) northwest of Nashville. The Johnson City - Kingsport - Bristol metropolitan area (known as Northeast Tennessee and "Tri-Cities") is the state's fourth largest metropolitan area and is located in the extreme northeastern part of the state.

Major cities

Chattanooga

Knoxville

Memphis

Nashville

 

 

Secondary cities

Bristol

Clarksville

Cleveland

Cookeville

Franklin

Hendersonville

Jackson

Johnson City

Kingsport

Murfreesboro

Oak Ridge

 

 

Education

University of Tennessee Rhodes College Vanderbilt University Colleges and universities

American Baptist College

Aquinas College

Austin Peay State University

Baptist Memorial College of Health Sciences

Belmont University

Bethel College

Bryan College

Carson-Newman College

Christian Brothers University

Columbia State Community College

Crichton College

Cumberland University

East Tennessee State University

Fisk University

Freed-Hardeman University

Johnson Bible College

King College

Knoxville College

Lambuth University

Lane College

Lee University

LeMoyne-Owen College

Lincoln Memorial University

Lipscomb University

Martin Methodist College

Maryville College

Meharry Medical College

Memphis College of Art

Middle Tennessee State University

Milligan College

 

 

Nashville State Community College

O'More College of Design

Rhodes College

Sewanee, The University of the South

Southern Adventist University

Tennessee State University

Tennessee Technological University

Tennessee Temple University

Tennessee Wesleyan College

Trevecca Nazarene University

Tusculum College

Union University

University of Memphis

University of Tennessee System University of Tennessee (Knoxville) University of Tennessee Health Science Center

University of Tennessee Space Institute

 

 

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

University of Tennessee at Martin

 

 

Vanderbilt University

Volunteer State Community College

Watkins College of Art and Design

 

 

Professional sports teams

The Memphis Grizzlies in action. Club Sport League Memphis Grizzlies

Basketball

National Basketball Association

Nashville Predators

Ice hockey

National Hockey League

Tennessee Titans

Football

National Football League

Knoxville Ice Bears

Ice hockey

Southern Professional Hockey League

Memphis RiverKings

Ice hockey

Central Hockey League

Chattanooga Lookouts

Baseball

Minor League Baseball

Elizabethton Twins

Baseball

Minor League Baseball

Greeneville Astros

Baseball

Minor League Baseball

Johnson City Cardinals

Baseball

Minor League Baseball

Kingsport Mets

Baseball

Minor League Baseball

Memphis Redbirds

Baseball

Minor League Baseball

Nashville Sounds

Baseball

Minor League Baseball

Tennessee Smokies

Baseball

Minor League Baseball

West Tenn Diamond Jaxx

Baseball

Minor League Baseball

Chattanooga Steamers

Basketball

American Basketball Association

Cleveland Majic

Basketball

World Basketball Association

Nashville Rhythm

Basketball

American Basketball Association

Memphis Express

Soccer

USL Premier Development League

Nashville Metros

Soccer

USL Premier Development League

Nashville Kats

Arena football

Arena Football League

Memphis Xplorers

Arena football

arenafootball2

Tennessee River Sharks

Indoor football

National Indoor Football League

Miscellaneous topics

Name origin

The earliest variant of the name that became Tennessee was recorded by Captain Juan Pardo , the Spanish explorer, when he and his men passed through a Native American village named "Tanasqui" in 1567 while traveling inland from South Carolina . European settlers later encountered a Cherokee town named Tanasi (or "Tanase") in present-day Monroe County, Tennessee . The town was located on a river of the same name (now known as the Little Tennessee River ). It is not known whether this was the same town as the one encountered by Juan Pardo.

The meaning and origin of the word are uncertain. Some accounts suggest it is a Cherokee modification of an earlier Yuchi word. It has been said to mean "meeting place", "winding river", or "river of the great bend". [2] [3] According to James Mooney , the name "can not be analyzed" and its meaning is lost (Mooney, pg. 534).

The modern spelling, Tennessee , is attributed to James Glen , the governor of South Carolina, who used this spelling in his official correspondence during the 1750s. In 1788, North Carolina created "Tennessee County", the third county to be established in what is now Middle Tennessee. (Tennessee County was the predecessor to current-day Montgomery County ). When a constitutional convention met in 1796 to organize a new state out of the Southwest Territory , it adopted "Tennessee" as the name of the state.

Trivia

The State of Tennessee has seven State Songs [4] .

On August 18 , 1920 , Tennessee became the thirty-sixth and clinching state to ratify the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution , which allowed women the right to vote .

USS Tennessee : Four ships of the United States Navy (and two ships of the Confederate States Navy ) have been named in honor of Tennessee.

Crossville, Tennessee is the location of the United States Chess Federation .

 

See also

List of people from Tennessee

List of Governors of Tennessee

Tennessee State Flag

Seal of Tennessee

Music of Tennessee

Scouting in Tennessee

 

References

^ Brief History of Tennessee in the War of 1812 from the Tennessee State Library and Archives. Retrieved April 30, 2006.

^ Satz, Ronald. Tennessee's Indian Peoples . Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 1979. ISBN 0-87049-285-3

 

Bontemps, Arna. William C. Handy: Father of the Blues: An Autobiography. Macmillan Company: New York, 1941.

Brownlow, W. G. Sketches of the Rise, Progress, and Decline of Secession: With a Narrative of Personal Adventures among the Rebels (1862)

Schaefer, Richard T. "Sociology Matters". New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2006. ISBN 0-07-299775-3

Mooney, James. "Myths of the Cherokee". 1900, reprinted Dover: New York, 1995.

 

Further reading

Norton, Herman. Religion in Tennessee, 1777-1945 . University of Tennessee Press, 1981.

Lamon, Lester C. Blacks in Tennessee, 1791-1970. University of Tennessee Press, 1980.

Van West, Carroll, ed. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture . 1998.

Van West, Carroll. Tennessee history: the land, the people, and the culture University of Tennessee Press, 1998.

Bergeron, Paul H. Antebellum Politics in Tennessee. University of Kentucky Press, 1982.

Cartwright, Joseph H. The Triumph of Jim Crow: Tennessee's Race Relations in the 1880s . University of Tennessee Press, 1976.

Cimprich, John. Slavery's End in Tennessee, 1861-1865 University of Alabama, 1985.

Honey, Michael K. Southern Labor and Black Civil Rights: Organizing Memphis Workers . University of Illinois Press, 1993.

Finger, John R. "Tennessee Frontiers: Three Regions in Transition". Indiana University Press, 2001.

 

 

Tennessee





Tennessee Encyclopedia Online

 

Tennessee Literary Figures from the Southern Literary Review

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

U.S. Census Bureau

GenealogyBuff.com - Tennessee Library of Files

Tennessee Blue Book - All things Tennessee

Timeline of Modern Tennessee Politics

Tennessee State Facts

 

State of Tennessee
History | Tennesseans | Constitution | Governors | General Assembly | Supreme Court

Capital: Nashville

 

Symbols: Flag | Great Seal | Agricultural insect | Bird | Butterfly | Cultivated flower | Game bird | Wild animal | Horse | Reptile | Wildflower | Tree

 

Grand
Divisions: East Tennessee | Middle Tennessee | West Tennessee

 

Regions: Blue Ridge Mountains | Ridge-and-valley Appalachians | Cumberland Plateau | Highland Rim | Nashville Basin | Mississippi Delta

 

Major cities: Chattanooga | Clarksville | Johnson City | Knoxville | Memphis | Murfreesboro | Nashville

 

Smaller cities: Athens | Bartlett | Bristol | Brownsville | Cleveland | Columbia | Cookeville | Crossville | Dickson | Dyersburg | Germantown | Greeneville | Harriman | Jackson | Kingsport | La Follette | Lawrenceburg | Lebanon | Lewisburg | McMinnville | Morristown | Mount Juliet | Newport | Oak Ridge | Paris | Rogersville | Sevierville | Shelbyville | Tullahoma | Union City | Winchester

 

Counties: Anderson | Bedford | Benton | Bledsoe | Blount | Bradley | Campbell | Cannon | Carroll | Carter | Cheatham | Chester | Clairborne | Clay | Cocke | Coffee | Crockett | Cumberland | Davidson | Decatur | DeKalb | Dickson | Dyer | Fayette | Fentress | Franklin | Gibson | Giles | Grainger | Greene | Grundy | Hamblen | Hamilton | Hancock | Hardeman | Hardin | Hawkins | Haywood | Henderson | Henry | Hickman | Houston | Humphreys | Jackson | Jefferson | Johnson | Knox | Lake | Lauderdale | Lawrence | Lewis | Lincoln | Loudon | Macon | Madison | Marion | Marshall | Maury | McMinn | McNairy | Meigs | Monroe | Montgomery | Moore | Morgan | Obion | Overton | Perry | Pickett | Polk | Putnam | Rhea | Roane | Robertson | Rutherford | Scott | Sequatchie | Sevier | Shelby | Smith | Stewart | Sullivan | Sumner | Tipton | Trousdale | Unicoi | Union | Van Buren | Warren | Washington | Wayne | Weakley | White | Williamson | Wilson

 

v · d · e Political divisions of the United States

States Alabama | Alaska | Arizona | Arkansas | California | Colorado | Connecticut | Delaware | Florida | Georgia | Hawaii | Idaho | Illinois | Indiana | Iowa | Kansas | Kentucky | Louisiana | Maine | Maryland | Massachusetts | Michigan | Minnesota | Mississippi | Missouri | Montana | Nebraska | Nevada | New Hampshire | New Jersey | New Mexico | New York | North Carolina | North Dakota | Ohio | Oklahoma | Oregon | Pennsylvania | Rhode Island | South Carolina | South Dakota | Tennessee | Texas | Utah | Vermont | Virginia | Washington | West Virginia | Wisconsin | Wyoming

Federal
district District of Columbia

Insular areas American Samoa | Guam | Northern Mariana Islands | Puerto Rico | Virgin Islands

Minor outlying
islands Baker Island | Howland Island | Jarvis Island | Johnston Atoll | Kingman Reef | Midway Atoll | Navassa Island | Palmyra Atoll | Wake Island

FULL CARE HORSE BOARDING:
  • freshly crimped oats twice/day
  • coastal hay
  • daily stall cleaning with clean wood shavings
  • daily turnouts (weather permitting)
  • free trailer parking
  • lighted indoor riding arena
  • outdoor round pen
  • 4-horse walker
OPTIONAL HORSE BOARDING SERVICES:
  • winter blanketing
  • stall fan
  • heat lamp
  • additional oats and/or hay
  • feed supplements
  • additional shavings
  • administration of medicine, (nonintravenous)
  • private paddocks
  • evening turnout

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No Doubts Farm
All breed all disclipline facilty. 2006 brought us Top 5 World placings in both stock and gaited breeds! We offer board, training, lessons, and sales. Our facilty includes 12x12 stalls, 100x200 vinyl arena, 60 round pen, and a indoor arena in late Jan 07.

This horse farm and stable services: Manchester, Tennessee

van doren show jumping
Van Doren Show Jumping educates individuals to excel in the field of equestrian sports Jumpers, Hunters and Eventing. Each year Van Doren Show Jumping takes on four new rider/horse/owner combinations to train and specialize in a jumping area suited to both horse and rider. Stabling is available for those in Training and Lessons. Log onto vandorenshowjumping.com for details.

This horse farm and stable services: Franklin, Tennessee

Cross Creek Farm
A full care boarding facility, that offers halter breaking,leadline, and despooking of problem horses.

Hunter Acres Farm
We offer both full care and pasture board. All weather riding ring, trails, close to 4 foxhunts, primary discipline in hunter/jumpers and foxhunting. We offer lessons, horse sales, and training.

This horse boarding stable services: Pulaski, Tennessee

Cowgirls Up Boarding & Training
Board and/or train your horse at Cowgirls Up where you will have access to indoor and outdoor arenas, obstable course, jump course, trails, 12 turnout paddocks and more. Our trainers are experienced with all disciples! Renee is a certified John Lyons Trainer and loves reining and gaited horses, and Ashley has 12 years experience of showing both hunter and jumper and was Marshall and Sterling Champion in 2001. Come and see us!

This horse farm and stable services: Murfreesboro, Tennessee

Wildwood Lodge, B&B, Stables and Cabins
Enjoy the endless miles of trails in Big South Fork National Park. 26 all wood, 10’ by 12’ stalls, concrete walkways and washracks, well-lit, well-ventilated and well-equipped in pristine grounds. Take a rest from camping and stay in our friendly, impeccably clean cabins or Bed & Breakfast. Fo to our web site for photos, rates and loads of information.

This horse farm and stable services: Jamestown, Tennessee

Back 9 Farms
Back 9 is a full service boarding and lesson facility featuring a 28 stall barn, two round pens, a large outdoor arena, trails, and an indoor arena coming soon. We are a family friendly barn that encourages safety and fun while catering to each individual boarder's needs.

This horse farm and stable services: Jackson, Tennessee

Clearview |Horse Farm
New All breed equestrian facility. New 50 stall show barn, all amenities. Show size indoor arena 300ft x 150. Floodlit outdoor. Roundpen. Covered hot walker, 82 flat acres, individual paddocks, trails, easy access, long or short term board available.Hookups and layovers wellcome. Tel 931 684 8822

Ride Light Equestrian Facility
All breed, All Discipline facility. Full staff of instructors ready to assist you with your training and riding needs. Whether reining or dressage; jumping or equitation, we have the right instructor for you! This fun-filled environment is managed by Arnold Warmels, Trainer, offering a full training program for colt starting; re-starting the problem horse; Both gaited and trotting breeds are welcomed. Ranch style training is our most popular requested method.

This horse boarding stable services: Murfreesboro, Tennessee

Sundance Farms
Sundance Farms is a boarding, training, lessons,parties facility. We have 10 great boarders...it is a small group of boarders but we always look to take on a few more. It is like a big family of horse lovers. We give lessons to any type of ride no matter what their ridding level. We have about 20 horses of all breeds. We also train horses to be great, compentent companions and excellent trail horses. We have about 300 acreas of fields, barns, and riding trails. Check out our site!

This horse farm and stable services: Chattanooga, Tennessee

KENSINGTON FARM
KENSINGTON FARM OFFERS LESSONS,TRAINING, BOARDING AND SALES, ALL AT A REASONABLE RATE. PLEASE GIVE US A CALL AND WE WILL SEE IF WE CAN HELP.

This horse farm and stable services: Murfreesboro, Tennessee

Ace-High Performance Horses
Full service equine facility offering boarding, training, riding lessons, camp programs, sales, and showing services. Please see our website or call us for more information.